Justice Administration

Category: Objective Test
Type: Individual

Overview

60-minute test administered during the NLC.

Objective Test Competencies: Corrections and Alternative Sanctions (Community Sentences, History and Current Information on Corrections and Prison Life); Courts and Adjudication (Prosecution and Defense, Pretrial Procedures, Criminal Trial and Punishment and Sentencing); Juvenile Justice System; Nature of Crime, Law, and Criminal Justice (Victimization, Substance & Procedure, and Current Justice Trends with Terrorism, Homeland Security, Cyber Crime); Police and Law Enforcement (History and Organization, Role and Function, Professional, Social, and Legal Issues); Basic Concepts


Guidelines

Objective Test Guidelines
Objective Test Guidelines
  • No materials may be brought to the testing site.
  • Electronic devices must be turned off and out of sight.
  • Financial calculators may be used for accounting, finance, and analysis & decision making events; calculators will be provided for all other events.
General Guidelines

The general event guidelines below are applicable to all national competitive events. Please review and follow these guidelines when competing at the national level. When competing at the state level, check the state guidelines since they may differ.

Eligibility

  • Dues: Competitors must have paid PBL national and state dues by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on April 15 of the current school year.
  • NLC Registration: Participants must be registered for the NLC and pay the national conference registration fee in order to participate in competitive events.
  • Deadlines: The state chair, or designee, must register each state competitor on the official online entry forms by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on the second Friday in May.
  • Each state may submit three (3) individuals in all events requiring only objective tests and two (2) individuals or teams for all events that require a pre-judged or performance component.
  • Each competitor can compete in two (2) events.
  • Each competitor must compete in all parts of an event for award eligibility.

Repeat Competitors

Competitors are not permitted to compete in an event more than once at the NLC unless one of the following circumstances applies:

  • Modified Events: A competitor may compete in the same event when the event is modified. Note, if the only modification is a name change, competitors may not compete in the renamed event.
  • Team Events: One (1) competitor of the team may have competed in the same event at one (1) previous NLC; however, they may not compete more than twice in the event at the national level.
  • Chapter Events: Competitors may compete in a chapter event more than once (Community Service Project).
  • Individual Entry: A competitor who competed as an individual entry in a team event at the national level may compete in the same event a second time as part of a team, but not a second time as an individual.
  • Parliamentary Procedure: Two (2) competitors of the team may have competed in this event at a previous NLC; however, they may not compete more than twice at the national level.
  • Pilot Event: Competition in a pilot event does not disqualify a competitor from competing in the same event if it becomes an official competitive event. The participant may compete in another event as well as a pilot event.

Breaking Ties

  • Objective Tests: Ties are broken by comparing the correct number of answers to the last 10 questions on the exam. If a tie remains, the competitor who completed the test in a shorter amount of time will place higher. If this does not break the tie, answers to the last 20 questions will be reviewed and determine the winner.
  • Objective and Production Tests: The production test scores will be used to break a tie.
  • Objective Tests and Performances: The objective test score will be used to break a tie based on the tie-breaking criteria of objective tests.
  • Reports/Projects and Performances: The report/project scores will be used to break a tie.
  • Performances: Judges must break ties and all judges’ decisions are final.

National Deadlines

  • State chair/adviser must register all competitors for NLC competitive events online by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on the second Friday in May.
  • All prejudged components (reports, websites, projects, statement of assurance) must be received by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on the second Friday in May.
  • All prejudged projects and reports must be submitted electronically.
  • All Statements of Assurance must be submitted online.
  • All production tests must be received at FBLA-PBL by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on the third Friday in May.
  • Desktop Publishing—two (2) copies of the finished product must be uploaded as PDF files by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on the third Friday in May.
  • All production tests must be uploaded online.
  • State chair/adviser may make name changes only (no additional entries) by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on the first Friday in June. Competitor drops are the only changes allowed after this date and onsite.

National Awards

The number of competitors will determine the number of winners. The maximum number of winners for each competitive event is 10. Only one (1) award is given to the schools competing in chapter events (Community Service Project and Local Chapter Annual Business Report).

Additional Materials

Certain events may allow the use of additional materials. Please refer to event guidelines.

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

FBLA‑PBL meets the criteria specified in the Americans with Disabilities Act for all participants who submit a special needs form.

Recording of Presentations

No unauthorized audio or video recording devices will be allowed in any competitive event. Participants in the performance events should be aware the national association reserves the right to record any performance for use in study or training materials.

Graduate Students

Graduate students may compete in all PBL events.


Preparation

Format Guide

Competencies
Competency
Tasks
Corrections and Alternative Sanctions (Community Sentences, History and Current Information on Corrections and Prison Life)
1. Apply the constitution, the amendments and civil liability to specific situations correctional personnel confront.
2. Evaluate past, present, and future trends pertaining to the development and operation of institutional and communitybased corrections.
3. Evaluate the trends pertaining to the development and use of classification and counseling approaches within the institutional and community-based correctional setting.
4. Apply theories from multiple disciplines (criminology, psychology, and counseling) to the investigation of micro and macro level issues pertinent to the offending population.
5. Evaluate current qualitative and quantitative research pertaining to offender assessment, counseling, corrections and treatment.
6. Evaluate trends pertaining to the development of various specialized offenders, including the juvenile offender.
7. Describe the history of the American corrections systems.
8. Discuss jails, prisons, local, state, and federal facilities.
9. Differentiate between the processes of probation and parole.
10. Identify the duties of personnel in correctional organizations.
11. Describe strategies for hiring and training entry level personnel in correctional positions.
12. Assess the strengths and weakness of various work schedules and assignments in correctional positions.
13. Describe the types of disciplinary procedures and sanctions that may be used by correctional agencies.
14. Explain the nature and impact of harassment in correctional agencies,
Courts and Adjudication (Prosecution and Defense, Pretrial Procedures, Criminal Trial and Punishment and Sentencing)
1. Cite examples that show the difference between civil and criminal court trials.
2. Describe the elements of a criminal trial.
3. Describe court organizations, functions, and procedures.
4. Describe the federal courts systems.
5. Articulate how burden of proof relates to a court trial.
6. . Explain the history of courts and arrangements of modern courts.
7. Define terms relevant to criminal litigation.
8. Organize files and documents and other exhibits used at trail or in pretrial proceedings.
9. Interview clients and witnesses.
10. Monitor client’s case and keep client informed.
11. Identify the types and purpose of evidence.
12. Describe the rules of evidence, “admissibility of evidence,” and “sufficiency of evidence.”
13. Discuss the nature, purpose, and legal framework of privileged information regarding evidence.
14. Discuss the roles of courtroom participants: judge, witnesses, court reporter, prosecuting attorney, and defense attorney.
15. Describe the roles and purposes of jurors, victims, court staff, and other participants.
16. Identify pretrial activities and post arrest procedures
17. Identify the steps in the trial process including jury selection, presentation of evidence, and verdict.
18. Identify effective tactics for responding to questioning during direct and cross examination.
19. Explain the types of bail and the bail process.
20. Describe the types of plea bargains.
21. Compare the types of punishment to the justifications for punishment.
22. Describe the process by which penalties are selected.
23. Describe the importance of appeals.
Juvenile Justice System
1. Discuss juvenile rights and juvenile law.
2. Discuss the history and origin of the juvenile justice system and the historical shifts in policies and treatment of juvenile delinquents.
3. Describe the various roles of police, juvenile court, juvenile probation, and juvenile corrections in the juvenile justice system.
4. Analyze the procedural aspects of the juvenile justice system
5. State the typical procedures and steps a juvenile offender undergoes in his/her progression through the system.
6. Examine changes (such as over representation of minorities in the juvenile justice system, waivers to adult court, death penalty, etc.) that have occurred within the juvenile system in the last twenty years.
7. Discuss the major theoretical perspectives related to the causes of juvenile delinquency and deviant behaviors
8. Identify major intervention strategies regarding juvenile justice and delinquency issues.
Nature of Crime, Law, and Criminal Justice (Victimization, Substance & Procedure, and Current Justice Trends with Terrorism, Homeland Security, Cyber Crime)
1. Explain the purpose of the criminal law system in the US.
2. Identify the differences between criminal, civil, and administrative laws.
3. Explain the difference between procedural and substantive criminal law.
4. Describe the development of common law and of statutory law
5. Describe the process by which criminal laws are made
6. Explain the influence of common law on the American legal system.
7. Describe historic landmark cases that established criminal law in the US.
8. Describe how Constitutional Law affects the criminal justice system as applied to Supreme Court rulings.
9. llustrate an example of an ex post facto law.
10. Explain the concept of criminal liability.
11. Explain the concept of criminal liability.
12. Describe the elements of certain crimes.
13. Classify the different degrees of misdemeanors and felonies.
14. Describe the concepts of criminal attempt, conspiracy and solicitation to commit a crime.
15. Discuss elements and punishments of crimes against persons.
16. Discuss elements and punishments of crimes against propert
17. Describe elements and punishments of crimes involving drugs.
18. Identify the criteria necessary to classify a criminal act as a “Hate Crime”.
19. Discuss the “drug war” and its impact on criminal justice administration.
20. Identify the characteristics and mentality of gang members.
21. Identify gang reduction initiatives, policies and programs.
22. Define terrorism and describe the characteristics of terrorism and terrorists.
23. Explain the difference between domestic, international and single issue terrorism.
24. Describe the relationship between gangs and terrorism.
25. Examine the purpose and function of the US Homeland Security Department.
26. Discuss the impact of immigration laws on the issuance of immigrant and non-immigrant
Police and Law Enforcement (History and Organization, Role and Function, Professional, Social, and Legal Issues)
1. Discuss the competencies required to be a good supervisor and the styles of supervision found among criminal justice supervisors, most notably police supervisors.
2. Apply the constitution, the amendments and civil liability to specific situations police confront.
3. Evaluate past, present, and future trends pertaining to the development and operation of the field of law enforcement.
4. Discuss the history of policing.
5. Discuss the role of law enforcement and their responsibilities.
6. Identify the legal requirements for probable cause, reasonable suspicion, stop and frisk, laws of arrest and search and seizure.
7. Identify the circumstances under which a peace officer is authorized to: detain a person, arrest without an arrest warrant, arrest with an arrest warrant, search and seize without a search warrant, and search and seize with a search warrant.
8. Identify the circumstances under which a peace officer is authorized to: detain a person, arrest without an arrest warrant, arrest with an arrest warrant, search and seize without a search warrant, and search and seize with a search warrant.
9. Describe what constitutes a legal search.
10. Identify the parameters of a lawful arrest.
11. Discuss the scope of the right to counsel.
12. Discuss interrogation and self-incrimination
13. Describe situations in which admission and/or confessions are legally obtained.
14. Describe on-duty and off-duty roles.
15. Relate management concepts to police organization and administration specifically
16. Evaluate issues of integrity, ethics, and police leadership.
17. Identify the legal requirements for the use of a lineup, photographic lineup, or show-up
18. Describe the chain of custody from time of discovery until submitted to the court.
19. Identify effective procedures for responding to, calming and restoring order and resolving family violence, domestic disputes and disturbances.
20. Identify the characteristics of the cycle of violence.
21. Identify effective methods of soliciting information from suspects, witnesses, and victims.
22. Identify effective methods for obtaining a valid physical description of a suspect from a victim or witness.
23. Explain the function of law enforcement from the transfer of a case to adjudication.
24. Describe terms and concepts associated with traffic offenses
25. Describe the typical progression of an adult through the law enforcement system.
Basic Concepts
1. Define the criminal justice system and its goals.
2. Describe the basic functions of the three components of the criminal justice system.
3. Discuss the organization and operation of administration of justice agencies.
4. Describe the evolution of the administration of justice system, its objectives, role expectations and trends.
5. pply knowledge of causal theories, criminal behavior and implications of crime statistics.
6. Describe the role of technology in facilitating or hindering communications within criminal justice organizations.
7. Describe and apply methods of identify and solving management and organizational performance problems.
8. Discuss the history and relationships between the criminal justice system components.
9. Apply legal terminology to specific situations.
10. Characterize specific areas of ethical dilemmas in legal professions, to include but not limited to corruption, abuse of power and authority, violations of civil rights, sexual misconduct etc.
11. Characterize specific areas of ethical dilemmas in the criminal justice system: corruption, racial discrimination, deception, sentencing, the death penalty, etc.
12. Contrast present day criminal justice traditions and practices with their historical precedents and beginnings.

Alignment

PBL Program of Study
Legal

Eligibility

States may submit up to 3 entries.
Competitors must be registered for NLC and pay registration fee.
Competitors must pay dues by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on April 15.

Timeline

Test: 1 hour